Category Archives: Modeling

For Those Who’d Like Modeling Advice

I remember like yesterday the day modeling first sparked my interest…

I was maybe 15 or 16 years old, playing around online, and came across a young woman’s profile. She had a sparkle in her eye that caught my eye immediately. As I started to browse, I read that she was a college student majoring in something like computer science and that she was living in Atlanta. She was a beautiful combination of Korean and African-American and my attention was definitely drawn to her. She had a great talent for the camera and her descriptions seemed as if she was also a very sweet and intelligent lady. Then I noticed she had a website; tomikaskanes.com it was (find her now at @tomikaskanes). And she had all kinds of tips and FAQ about the modeling industry that could help someone get started. So that was it. I was hooked.

I mean, I loved to take pictures. Would I be any good? Possibly. Would my parents let me? Absolutely not. “Modeling” had a worldly connotation in the minds of Christian/military parents! But I decided I do all the research I could until I went away to college and had a real opportunity. And that’s exactly what I did. I did everything this Tomika-lady said to do.

So I started modeling (as a hobby) during my freshman year traveling back and forth to Atlanta on the weekends. I was in LOVE with being in front of the camera once I really warmed up and felt comfortable enough with my body. Sophomore year, I even lost the 30 pounds I had gained my first year! Wow, I know.

Here I am. Here are four basic steps I took. If you have any other questions, which many of my Facebook friends do, just feel free to send me a message or comment!

  1. Join www.modelmayhem.com. Upload clean, clear photos – a head shot, a full body shot, and a 3/4 shot. As a new model, you will probably want to wear little to no make up in at least a couple of the pictures. If you don’t have any professional modeling pics yet, upload anything of yourself you can find that is clean.
  2. NETWORK! Add people in your area (models, photographers, make-up artists, designers, etc.). View their work and learn good tips from them. Make friends with these people. Industry people are always looking to network with you, even if you’re new. Most people are extremely helpful and friendly! But just as with any online network, be careful. Don’t share too much personal information. Creeps are everywhere on the Internet.
  3. Ask for TFP or TFCD work with photographers who has quality images. This means Time For Print or CD (of images that are taken during the shoot). You are trading time with each other in exchange for photos you will receive afterward. This means no one gets paid; essentially, it’s a free shoot. Most well-known and established photographers do not offer this however. Just remember, you have to start somewhere and work your way up.
  4. Choose only one or two of your best shots from each shoot – preferably a head shot and a full shot. It doesn’t always look good to upload ten pictures from one shoot. Just do this and continue to network and pratice posing in the mirror and keep your eyes/ears open for professional casting calls.

If you want to go into runway, print, acting, it’s best to find someone experienced in that area and have them mentor you. But I’m sure these four steps are a great way for you as a beginnger to get your feet wet. I HOPE THIS HELPS!

🙂

Advertisements

“What Happened to The Good Girlz?”

Finally, here is the raw and uncut answer…

But first, The Good Girlz would like to apologize to our fans and supporters for just disappearing the way we did with no explanation or warning. We truly appreciate all of your love over the two years in which we were in existence! Now here is the answer some of you have been asking for.

The Good Girlz was founded by a well-known aspiring rap artist/Georgia Southern student in 2007. We first began as only three random, very amateur female models — one Georgia Southern student (myself) and two Savannah State students (his cousin and her friend). Our purpose was to promote his music — performances, mixtapes, videos, parties, download links, etc. But we very quickly sprouted into a small but popular promotional modeling group and began to gain more models. We immediately became known for our hard core dedication and loyalty toward this aspiring rapper, mostly because our take-over of the World Wide Web! If he gave us a task, we were on it immediately and we went hard. I actually believe that if it wasn’t for our beauty that people would have written us off as spammers! However, our fan base grew to thousands and several girls started inquiring and applying to have a spot on The Good Girlz modeling team.

Our popularity and success was not expected at all. We were supposed to just be the face of his label, passing out flyers and sending out mass Facebook messages. But we gained so much exposure from our undying promotional tactics –not only for the artist but for ourselves as aspiring models– that we just had to take the opportunity and run with it.

We started being contacted by several photographers in and out of state who were interested in working with us, we were inquired about for hire by casting directors for music videos, and we were definitely without a doubt called on by the event planning and promoting kings of the nightlife. People either wanted us for their online magazines, music videos, or to hire us to promote for them (since we were so excellent at promoting)! And all the while, we still did what we were supposed to do for the said aspiring rapper and his label. So what went wrong and when?

Long story short, we were dropped from the label. We were unhappy with our position in the organization, we felt highly unappreciated, and so on. As a branch of the label, I guess we expected more from them. We put in WORK. People would always tell us that we went hardcore with promoting the label’s music and events, day and night. No other promo group went to the levels that we did. We were serious and about our business! We felt unappreciated so I guess it started to show in our work… :-/ We had no motivation. We also felt like they didn’t want to get to know us because we suggested time and time again that we have socials as an organization or at least have meetings on a regular basis so that everyone could make suggestions and share business ideas. But…oh well.

Working (and playing) with the Good Girlz was the highlight of my college career – the meetings, the photo shoots, the parties, the everything! We have this sisterhood that is unlike any other. It is just unfortunate that we had to end. We could have continued on our own but we decided that we would just focus the rest of our time in college on our academics and restart on the modeling path on our own time.

Thank you to EVERYONE who was supportive of us! You were die hard just like we were and we will never forget that! 🙂

(Shout out to the following Good Girlz in order by when they joined: Morgan Daniele, Mia McDaniel, Shatique Clark, Erika Ervin, Vania Taylor, Seannika Smith, Alana Pulliam, Iliana Douge, Ashley Jenelle Williams, Tanisha Mosley, & if I forgot anyone I sincerely apologize! Also big shout out to the members of the label as well as Alex Hall who was an amazing presidential assistant to Erika and I!)

And speaking of Morgan Daniele, I met my now best friend in 2007 via the formation of the Good Girlz modeling group! XOXO